HackDFW: Dallas’ first major student hackathon

Next year, the city of Dallas will have its first major student-organized hackathon.

Over the last weekend in February, students from our fabulous local colleges and universities will be teaming up to build new technologies. The gates will open on Saturday, February 28th and continue until Sunday, March 1st. The full schedule will be posted on HackDFW’s website soon.

Three local DFW schools are working together to make this event possible: UTD, SMU, and UNT. Adil Shaikh, president of HackersUTD, has been heavily involved with the plans for the event and is looking forward to bringing students from all over the metroplex together to build awesome projects.

“There’s no reason Dallas can’t have a huge hackathon like other cities around the world,” says Shaikh. He’s been reaching out to various companies and corporations for partnerships and sponsoring opportunities, and the registrations are already coming in.

All students are welcome, and that includes high schoolers, undergraduate students, and graduate students from the area. The event is FREE, and includes WiFi, food, drinks, and miscellaneous swag for the entire hackathon.

Not sure what to hack? There’s plenty to inspire you there: Oculus Rifts, Myo arm-bands, Leap Motions, and Arduinos will be available to hack on for the duration of the event.

Follow along with HackDFW on Twitter and Facebook for more details!

  • Rachel is a freelance writer and works at Soap Hope in downtown Dallas. She hates the term "disrupt," tweets about startups, and appreciates a well-crafted hashtag.

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