Google Names Addison as 2014 eCity

We are SO THRILLED to hear that Google has named Addison as the 2014 eCity for the State of Texas, “joining the ranks of America’s leading cities in the digital economy.” 

Startups and corporations alike have been able to leverage the Internet to build momentum in business and grow their online audiences. The eCity Awards “recognize the strongest online business communities in all fifty states,” according to a recent release. “The businesses in these communities are embracing the web to find new customers, connect with existing clients and fuel their local economies. Addison joins the ranks of America’s leading cities in the digital economy.

“Addison serves as a prime example of how innovation and growth in e-commerce can successfully contribute to bolstering economic progress and competitiveness,” said Google representative, Emma Ogiemwanye. “Google is proud to recognize Addison’s accomplishment, and the role it plays in creating Texas jobs.”

“Addison is very proud of our technically savvy business community. As a city, we take great pride in being a progressive community who helps promote our businesses through a variety of digital formats including blogs, newsletters, social media, and eblasts – and we will launch a robust new city website in January 2015,” said Mayor Todd Meier. “We have a new business incubator, the Addison TreeHouse, which showcases the very best of North Texas tech-entrepreneurs and we work closely with them to help them grow and prosper. From startups to Fortune 100 companies, Addison businesses are excellent examples of how business is using innovation and technology to remain at the forefront of success.

The winning cities “exhibited strong engagement and potential for growth within the digital economy.” You can find more information on eCities here.  

The full press release is here.

 

 

(Image source: Addison Facebook page)

Rachel Winstead
winstead.rachel@gmail.com

Rachel is a freelance writer and works at Soap Hope in downtown Dallas. She hates the term "disrupt," tweets about startups, and appreciates a well-crafted hashtag.